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Lift your lamp beside the golden door, Break not the golden rule, avoid well the golden calf, know; not all that glitters is gold, and laissez faire et laissez passer [let do and let pass] but as a shining sentinel, hesitate not to ring the bell, defend the gates, and man the wall

Sociable

Friday, July 30, 2010

Founding Mothers of the American Revolution

Wives of the Signers by Mary W. Green













 The Faith of America's First Ladies by Jane Hampton Cook











 
 

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Dr.Martin Luther King Jr.

Wikipedia

Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African American civil rights movement. His main legacy is securing progress on civil rights in the United States. Because of this work, he has become a human rights icon. For example, Dr. King is even recognized as a martyr by two Christian churches.[1] A Baptist minister, King became a civil rights activist early in his career.[2] He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found theSouthern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King's efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he raised public consciousness of the civil rights movement and incidentally established himself as one of the greatest orators in U.S. history.

In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. By the time of his death in 1968, he had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and the Vietnam War, both from a religious perspective. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004; Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 1986.

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Quotes

“When people criticize Zionists they mean Jews, you are talking anti-Semitism.”- Martin Luther King, responding to an anti-zionist remark by a student at Harvard University in Boston, 1968.

"I cannot stand idly by, even though I happen to live in the United States and even though I happen to be an American Negro and not be concerned about what happens to the Jews in Soviet Russia. For what happens to them happens to me and you, and we must be concerned."

"Israel's right to exist as a state in security is uncontestable."

"Peace for Israel means security, and we must stand with all our might to protect its right to exist, its territorial integrity. I see Israel as one of the great outposts of democracy in the world, and a marvelous example of what can be done, how desert land can be transformed into an oasis of brotherhood and democracy. Peace for Israel means security and that security must be a reality." - Martin Luther King, on March 25, 1968, less than 2 weeks before his death.

"I solemnly pledge to do my utmost to uphold the fair name of the Jews -- because bigotry in any form is an affront to us all."

Attributed-

www.jewish-history.com/mlk_zionism.html

www.rosenblit.com/MLK.htm

"The Negro people, my friend, know what it is to suffer the torment of tyranny under rulers not of our choosing. Our brothers in Africa have begged, pleaded, requested -- DEMANDED the recognition and realization of our inborn right to live in peace under our own sovereignty in our own country.

How easy it should be, for anyone who holds dear this inalienable right of all Mankind, to understand and support the right of the Jewish people to live in their ancient Land of Israel. All men of good will exult in the fulfillment of God's Promise, that His People should return in joy to rebuild their plundered Land. This is Zionism, nothing more, nothing less.

And what is anti-Zionist? It is the denial to the Jewish people of a fundamental right that we justly claim for the people of Africa and freely accord all other nations of the Globe. It is discrimination against Jews, my friend, because they are Jews. In short, it is Antisemitism."
 
From M.L. King Jr., "Letter to an Anti-Zionist Friend," Saturday Review_XLVII (Aug. 1967), p. 76.
Reprinted in M.L. King Jr., "This I Believe: Selections from the Writings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr."

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"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter."
  





    
"We will match your capacity to inflict suffering with our capacity to endure suffering. We will meet your physical force with soul dorce. We will not hate you, but we cannot in all good conscience obey your unjust laws. Do to us what you will and we will still love you. Bomb our homes and threaten our children; send your hooded perpetrators of violence into our communities and drag us out on some wayside road, beating us and leaving us half dead, and we will sstill love you. But we will sooon wear you down by our capacity to suffer. And in winnig our freedom we will so appeal to your heart and conscience that we will win you in the process." -Paraphase from Gandhi


"One of the sure signs of maturity is the ability to rise to the point of self-criticism. Whenever we are objects of criticism from white men, even though the criticisms are maliciously directed and mixed with half-truths, we must pick out the elements of truth and make them the basis of creative reconstruction. We must not let the fact that we are the victims of the injustice lull us into abrogating responsibility for our own lives."


"Whoever falls in love with publicity is not fit to have it and will end up in misery"

"Through our scientific and technological genius we've made of this world a neighborhood. And now through our moral and ethical commitment we must make of it a brotherhood. We must all learn to live together as brothers—or we will all perish together as fools. "

"The Christians who engaged in infamous persecutions and shameful inquisitions were not evil men but misguided men. The churchmen who felt they had an edict from God to withstand the progress of science, whether in the form of a Copernican revolution or a Darwinian theory of natural selection, were not mischievous men but misinformed men. And so Christ's words from the cross are written in sharp-edged terms across some of the most inexpressible tragedies of history: 'They know not what they do'. "

"Segregationalists will even argue that God was the first segregationalist. 'Red birds and blue birds don't fly together,' they contend. ...They turn to some pseudo-scientific writing and argue that the Negro's brain is smaller than the white man's brain. They do not know, or they refuse to know that the idea of an inferior or superior race has been refuted by the best evidence of the science of anthropology. Great anthropologists, like Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Melville J. Herskovits, agree that, although there may be inferior and superior individuals within all races, there is no superior or inferior race. And segregationalists refuse to acknowledge that there are four types of blood, and these four types are found within every racial group. "

"Science investigates; religion interprets. Science gives man knowledge which is power; region gives man wisdom which is control. Science deals mainly with facts; religion deals mainly with values. The two are not rivals. They are complementary. "
   
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The "I Have A Dream" Speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. [Blog] [Americanrhetoric.com]


  
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http://asderathoslchaim.blogspot.com/2010/11/asderathos-vs-merchan5967-beck-vs-king.html
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America's Prophet: Moses and the American Story by Bruce Feiler



Monday, July 26, 2010

Thomas Jefferson


Thomas Jefferson
(April 13, 1743 – July 4, 1826)[2]
Wiki-bloody-pedia

Jefferson was one of the most influential Founding Fathers, known for his promotion of the ideals of republicanism in the United States. Jefferson envisioned America as the force behind a great "Empire of Liberty"[3] that would promote republicanism and counter the imperialism of the British Empire.

Major events during his presidency include the Louisiana Purchase (1803) and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804–1806), as well as escalating tensions with both Britain and France that led to war with Britain in 1812, after he left office.


As a political philosopher, Jefferson was a man of the Enlightenment and knew many intellectual leaders in Britain and France. He idealized the independent yeoman farmer as exemplar of republican virtues, distrusted cities and financiers, and favored states' rights and a strictly limited federal government. Jefferson supported the separation of church and state[4] and was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (1779, 1786). He was the eponym of Jeffersonian democracy and the cofounder and leader of the Democratic-Republican Party, which dominated American politics for 25 years. Jefferson served as the wartime Governor of Virginia (1779–1781), firstUnited States Secretary of State (1789–1793), and second Vice President of the United States (1797–1801).
polymath, Jefferson achieved distinction as, among other things, a horticulturist, political leader, architectarchaeologistpaleontologist, musician, inventor, and founder of the University of Virginia. When President John F. Kennedy welcomed 49 Nobel Prize winners to theWhite House in 1962 he said, "I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent and of human knowledge that has ever been gathered together at the White House – with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone."[5] To date, Jefferson is the only president to serve two full terms in office without vetoing a single bill of Congress. Jefferson has been consistently ranked by scholars as one of the greatest of U.S. presidents.

Jefferson, Madison, and the "wall of separation"
The phrase "[A] hedge or wall of separation between the garden of the church and the wilderness of the world" was first used by Baptist theologian Roger Williams, the founder of the colony of Rhode Island, in his 1644 book The Bloody Tenent of Persecution.[13][14]

The phrase was later used by Thomas Jefferson as a description of the First Amendment and its restriction on the legislative branch of the federal government, in an 1802 letter [15] to the Danbury Baptists [LINK] (a religious minority concerned about the dominant position of the Congregationalist church in Connecticut), assuring that their rights as a religious minority would be protected from federal interference. As he stated:
Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his god, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their "legislature" should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between church and State. Adhering to this expression of the supreme will of the nation in behalf of the rights of conscience, I shall see with sincere satisfaction the progress of those sentiments which tend to restore to man all his natural rights, convinced he has no natural right in opposition to his social duties.
Jefferson's letter was in reply to a letter[16] that he had received from the Danbury Baptist Association dated October 7, 1801. 

In an 1808 letter to Virginia Baptists, Jefferson would use the same theme:

We have solved, by fair experiment, the great and interesting question whether freedom of religion is compatible with order in government and obedience to the laws. And we have experienced the quiet as well as the comfort which results from leaving every one to profess freely and openly those principles of religion which are the inductions of his own reason and the serious convictions of his own inquiries
Jefferson and James Madison's conceptions of separation have long been debated. Jefferson refused to issue Proclamations of Thanksgiving sent to him by Congress during his presidency, though he did issue a Thanksgiving and Prayer proclamation as Governor of Virginia.[17][18] Madison issued four religious proclamations while President,[19] but vetoed two bills on the grounds they violated the first amendment.[20] On the other hand, both Jefferson and Madison attended religious services at the Capitol.[21] Years before the ratification of the Constitution, Madison contended "Because if Religion be exempt from the authority of the Society at large, still less can it be subject to that of the Legislative Body."[22] After retiring from the presidency, Madison wrote of "total separation of the church from the state."[23] "Strongly guarded as is the separation between Religion & Govt in the Constitution of the United States," Madison wrote,[24] and he declared, "practical distinction between Religion and Civil Government is essential to the purity of both, and as guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States."[25] In a letter to Edward Livingston Madison further expanded, "We are teaching the world the great truth that Govts. do better without Kings and Nobles than with them. The merit will be doubled by the other lesson that Religion flourishes in greater purity, without than with the aid of Govt." [26] Madison's original draft of the Bill of Rights had included provisions binding the States, as well as the Federal Government, from an establishment of religion, but the House did not pass them.[citation needed]

J
efferson's opponents said his position was the destruction and the governmental rejection of Christianity, but this was a caricature.[27] In setting up the University of Virginia, Jefferson encouraged all the separate sects to have preachers of their own, though there was a constitutional ban on the State supporting a Professorship of Divinity, arising from his own Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom.[28] Some have argued that this arrangement was "fully compatible with Jefferson's views on the separation of church and state;"[29] however, others point to Jefferson’s support for a scheme in which students at the University would attend religious worship each morning as evidence that his views were not consistent with strict separation.[30
]

J
efferson's letter entered American jurisprudence in the 1878 Mormon polygamy case Reynolds v. U.S., in which the court cited Jefferson and Madison, seeking a legal definition for the word religion. Writing for the majority, Justice Stephen Johnson Field cited Jefferson's Letter to the Danbury Baptists to state that "Congress was deprived of all legislative power over mere opinion, but was left free to reach actions which were in violation of social duties or subversive of good order."[31] Considering this, the court ruled that outlawing polygamy was constitutional.

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The 'Separation of Church and State'
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Thomas Jefferson Wrote 19,000 Written Letters; He questions Orthodox Christian Teachings in only 6 of those letters.

An original document, signed by President Thomas Jefferson on September 24, 1807 "In the year of our Lord, Christ"; granting permission for a ship called the Herschel to proceed on its journey to the port of London.
Many official documents say "in the year of our Lord," but very few include the word "Christ." This is explicitly Christian language that President Thomas Jefferson chose to use in official public presidential documents.
"say nothing of my religion. It is known to my God and myself alone. Its evidence before the world is to be sought in my life; if that has been honest and dutiful to society, the religion which has regulated it cannot be a bad one."
Both The First Woman (Dorathy Ripley) and first black man (Henrey Highland Garnet) to Preach in our capital did so in a Church built by Jefferson.  
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TIME LINE
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1758



Thomas Jefferson's Letter to John Taylor June 1 1758

Finding Jefferson by Alan Dershowitz pages 216-217
http://books.google.com/books?id=QuN0Q_wsR0AC&pg=PA216

8. Many of those prosecuted were Jews, Italians, and other minority immigrant groups. Jefferson apparently had mixed views with regard to Jews. Thjough he opposed their persecution, he characterized them as having "a perversity of character" (letter to John Taylor, June 1, 1758) and described their religion in the following terms:
  II. Jews. 1. Their system was Deism; that is, the belief in one only God. But their ideas of him and of his attributes were degrading and injurious.
2. Their Ethics were not only imperfect, but often irreconcilable with the sound dictates of reaon and morality, as they respect intercourse with those around us; and repulsive and anti-social, as respecting other nations. They needed reformation, therefore, in an eminent degree.
III. Jesus. In this state of things among the Jews, Jesus appeared. His parentage was obscure; his condition poor; his education null; his natural endowments great; this life correct and innocent: he was meek, benevolent, patient, firm, disinterested, and of the sublimest eloquence.
1. He corrected the Deism of the JEws, confirming them in their belief of one only God, and giving them juster notions of his attributes and government.
  2. his moral doctrines, relating to kindred and friends, were more pure and perfect than those of the most correct of the philosophers and greatly,y more so than those of the Jews; and they went far beyond both in inculcating universal philanthropy, not only to kindred and friends, to neighbors and countrymen, but to all mankind gathering all into one family, under the bonds of love, charity, peace, common wants and common aids. A development of this head will evince the peculiar superiority of the system of Jesus over all others.
3. The precepts of philosophy, and of the Hebrew code, laid hold of actions only. He pushed his scrutinies into the heart of man[;] erected his tribunal in the region of his thoughts, and prified the waters at the fountain head.
4. He taught, emphatically, the doctrines of a future state, which was either doubted, or disbelieved by the Jews; and wielded it with efficacy, as an important incentive, supplementary to the other motives to moral conduct.
Quoted in Joyce Appleby and Terence Ball, eds., Thomas Jefferson: Political Writings (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999), pp. 268-270. Jefferson was apparently more familiar with the Jewish Bible than with the rabbinic and Talmudic literature. His stereotypes were somewhat typical for his era.
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1774
In 1774, while serving in the Virginia Assembly, Jefferson personally introduced a resolution calling for a Day of Fasting and Prayer.

A Summary View of the Rights of British America August 1774 [Liberty Online]
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1776

The Declaration of Independence [Wikipedia]
Thomas Jefferson Was The principal author of the 1st Draft of the Declaration of Independence
First Draft Written with John Adams' Input (Wikisource) (Princeton.edu)
Final Draft: Benjamin Franklin's Editorial for acceptability to the Continental Congress to avoid it's mangling. (Wikisource)
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1777
  
The Virginia Committee of Revisor's Bill No.s 82 and 84 were drafted by Thomas Jefferson [Blog]
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1779

VA Governor Thomas Jefferson's Proclamation Appointing a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer, November 11, 1779 [for Dec 9th]
"[I] appoint . . . a day of public Thanksgiving to Almighty God. . . to [ask] Him that He would . . . pour out His Holy Spirit on all ministers of the Gospel; that He would . . . spread the light of Christian knowledge through the remotest corners of the earth; . . . and that He would establish these United States upon the basis of religion and virtue."
The Papers ofThomas Jefferson, Julian P. Boyd, editor (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1951), Vol. 3, p. 178, Proclamation Appointing a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer, November 11, 1779. [WallBuilders]
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1781

Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVIII: Manners
Ford, Paul Leicester, ed. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1892-99. 10 vols.
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1785

Thomas Jefferson's Letter to James Madison Oct. 28 1785
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1787
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1800s

1801-1809 Thomas Jefferson was The Third President of the United States
List of the Presidents of the USA (Wikipedia)
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1801

March 4th Jefferson's First Inauguration

Jefferson's Attributed Inaugural Prayer "National Prayer of Peace" 
March 4, 1801 [Beliefnet.com]

"A Prayer for the Nation"

Almighty God, Who has given us this good land for our heritage; We humbly beseech Thee that we may always prove ourselves a people mindful of Thy favor and glad to do Thy will. Bless our land with honorable ministry, sound learning, and pure manners. Save us from violence, discord, and confusion, from pride and arrogance, and from every evil way. Defend our liberties, and fashion into one united people, the multitude brought hither out of many kindreds and tongues. Endow with Thy spirit of wisdom those whom in Thy name we entrust the authority of government, that there may be justice and peace at home, and that through obedience to Thy law, we may show forth Thy praise among the nations of the earth. In time of prosperity fill our hearts with thankfulness, and in the day of trouble, suffer not our trust in Thee to fail; all of which we ask through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

1801 March 4th Jefferson's Inaugural Address 

June 23, 2006 by Daniel Dreisbach
Jefferson was inaugurated the third President of the United States on March 4, 1801, following one of the most bitterly contested elections in history. His religion, or the alleged lack thereof, was a critical issue in the campaign. His Federalist Party foes vilified him as an infidel and atheist. The campaign rhetoric was so vitriolic that, when news of Jefferson's election swept across the country, housewives in New England were seen burying family Bibles in their gardens or hiding them in wells because they expected the Holy Scriptures to be confiscated and burned by the new Administration in Washington. (These fears resonated with Americans who had received alarming reports of the French Revolution, which Jefferson was said to support, and the widespread desecration of religious sanctuaries and symbols in France.)


1801 December 8th  First State of the Union Address 
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1802 
1802 Jan 1st Letter to the Danbury Baptists  [Blog]
June 23, 2006 by Daniel Dreisbach


One pocket of support for the Jeffersonian Republicans in Federalist New England existed among the Baptists. At the dawn of the 19th century, Jefferson's Federalist opponents, led by John Adams, dominated New England politics, and the Congregationalist church was legally established in Massachusetts and Connecticut. The Baptists, who supported Jefferson, were outsiders--a beleaguered religious and political minority in a region where a Congregationalist-Federalist axis dominated political life.
 

1802 Dec 15th Second State of the Union Address  [Wikisource]
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1803

1803 October 17th The Third State of the Union Address

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Thomas_Jefferson%27s_Third_State_of_the_Union_Address

1803 December 3rd The Treaty With The Kaskia Indians [Blog]


1803 April 21 Jefferson's Letter to Dr. Benjamin Rush on The Morals of Jesus

http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/P/tj3/writings/brf/jefl153.htm


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1804

1804 The Jefferson Bible: The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth [pdf top.com]
In an 1803 letter to Joseph Priestley, Jefferson states that he conceived the idea of writing his view of the "Christian System" in a conversation with Dr.Benjamin Rush during 1798–99. He proposes beginning with a review of the morals of the ancient philosophers, moving on to the "deism and ethics of the Jews," and concluding with the "principles of a pure deism" taught by Jesus, "omitting the question of his deity." Jefferson explains that he really doesn't have the time, and urges the task on Priestley as the person best equipped to accomplish the task.
Jefferson accomplished a more limited goal in 1804 with “The Philosophy of Jesus of Nazareth,” the predecessor to Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth. He described it in a letter to John Adams dated 13 October 1813:
"In extracting the pure principles which he [Jesus] taught, we should have to strip off the artificial vestments in which they have been muffled by priests, who have travestied them into various forms, as instruments of riches and power to themselves. We must dismiss the Platonists and Plotinists, the Stagyrites and Gamalielites, the Eclectics, the Gnostics and Scholastics, their essences and emanations, their logos and demiurges, aeons and daemons, male and female, with a long train of … or, shall I say at once, of nonsense. We must reduce our volume to the simple evangelists, select, even from them, the very words only of Jesus, paring off the amphibologisms into which they have been led, by forgetting often, or not understanding, what had fallen from him, by giving their own misconceptions as his dicta, and expressing unintelligibly for others what they had not understood themselves. There will be found remaining the most sublime and benevolent code of morals which has ever been offered to man. I have performed this operation for my own use, by cutting verse by verse out of the printed book, and arranging the matter which is evidently his, and which is as easily distinguishable as diamonds in a dunghill. The result is an octavo of forty-six pages, of pure and unsophisticated doctrines.” 

 
Jefferson frequently expressed discontent with this earlier version. The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth represents the fulfillment of his desire to produce a more carefully assembled edition.


1804 November 8th Fourth State of the Union Address [Wikisource]
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1805

1805 March 4th Jefferson's 2nd Inaugural Address (Wikisource(Bartelby
 

1805 December 3rd Fifth State of the Union Address (Wikisource)
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1806
 
1806 December 2nd Sixth State of the Union Address (Wikisource)
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1807
October 27th Seventh State of the Union Address (Wikisource)
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1808

1808 Jan 23rd Jefferson's Letter To Rev. Samuel Miller (Blog)


1808 Nov 8th Eighth State of the Union Address (Wikisource)

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1812

 Jefferson's Parliamentary Practice Manual 1812 [Constitution.org]
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1822

Jefferson's Letter To Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse 1822 [Blog]

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QUOTES
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Quotes for which I have found citation [having not much looked]
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A Summary View of the Rights of British America August 1774
"Let them name their terms, but let them be just. Accept of every commercial preference it is in our power to give for such things as we can raise for their use, or they make for ours. But let them not think to exclude us from going to other markets to dispose of those commodities which they cannot use, or to supply those wants which they cannot supply. Still less let it be proposed that our properties within our own territories shall be taxed or regulated by any power on earth but our own. The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them."

---
Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVIII: Manners 1781

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever"
---
letter to James Madison December 1787
"A Bill of Rights is what the people are entitled to against  every government on earth."
---
Draft Kentucky Resolution (October 1798. ME 17:388)
"It is jealousy and not confidence which prescribes limited constitutions, to bind down those whom we are obliged to trust with power... Our Constitution has accordingly fixed the limits to which, and no further, our confidence may go... In questions of power, then, let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution." 
---
letter to Samuel Miller January 23, 1808
“I consider the government of the US. as interdicted by the constitution from intermedling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises. this results not only from the provision that no law shall be made respecting the establishment, or free exercise of religion, but from that also which reserves to the states the powers not delegated to the US.” 

[Interdicted = Deterred]
It should be noted, the States’ Incorporation of the Bill of Rights was not in place at the time of this quote; and it was something that was ongoing from 1833-1963
---
letter to John Adams January 11, 1817
"One of our fan-coloring biographers, who paints small men as very great, inquired of me lately with real affection too, whether he might consider as authentic, the change of my religion much spoken of in some circles. Now this supposed that they knew what had been my religion before, taking for it the word of their priests, whom I certainly never made the confidants of my creed. My answer was "say nothing of my religion. It is known to my God and myself alone. Its evidence before the world is to be sought in my life; if that has been honest and dutiful to society, the religion which has regulated it cannot be a bad one."
published in The Works of Thomas Jefferson in Twelve Volumes, Federal Edition, Paul Leicester Ford, ed., New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904,Vol. 12, pp. 48–49.["Fan-Coloring" means that the biographer 'painted over' what they did not know about, with something altogether made up]

---

On every question of construction, carry ourselves back to the time when the constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates, and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text, or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed.
Thomas Jefferson in a letter To Justice William Johnson, June 12, 1823


---
Quotes, the citations for which I have not yet endeavored 
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"A democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where fifty-one percent of the people may take away the rights of the other forty-nine"

"A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned - this is the sum of good government."

"All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent."

"An association of men who will not quarrel with one another is a thing which has never yet existed, from the greatest confederacy of nations down to a town meeting or a vestry." (The Only Necessary Argument Against Utopianists)

"Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny."

"Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear."

"For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well-organized and armed militia is their best security."

"Force is the vital principle and immediate parent of despotism."

"History, in general, only informs us of what bad government is."

"Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom."

"I abhor war and view it as the greatest scourge of mankind."

"I am an Epicurean. I consider the genuine (not the imputed) doctrines of Epicurus as containing everything rational in moral philosophy which Greek and Roman leave to us."

"I am mortified to be told that, in the United States of America, the sale of a book can become a subject of inquiry, and of criminal inquiry too."

"I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around [the banks] will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs."

"I cannot live without books."

"I do not take a single newspaper, nor read one a month, and I feel myself infinitely the happier for it."

"I find that he is happiest of whom the world says least, good or bad."

"I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have."

"I have no ambition to govern men; it is a painful and thankless office."

"I have no fear that the result of our experiment will be that men may be trusted to govern themselves without a master."

"I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man."

"I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them" 

"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be."

"If God is just, I tremble for my country."

"If the present Congress errs in too much talking, how can it be otherwise in a body to which the people send one hundred and fifty lawyers, whose trade it is to question everything, yield nothing, and talk by the hour?"

"If there is one principle more deeply rooted in the mind of every American, it is that we should have nothing to do with conquest."

"Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong."

"In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock."

"No man will ever carry out of the Presidency the reputation which carried him into it."

"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden."

"Nothing is unchangeable but the inherent and unalienable rights of man."

"The boisterous sea of liberty is never without a wave."

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not"

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."

"The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers."

"The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground."

"The republican is the only form of government which is not eternally at open or secret war with the rights of mankind."

"The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions that I wish it to be always kept alive."

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government"

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants." 
(The cycle of Civilizations Renewal Seems About 200 years)

"The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other. Our children see this, and learn to imitate it."

"The world is indebted for all triumphs which have been gained by reason and humanity over error and oppression."

"There is a natural aristocracy among men. The grounds of this are virtue and talents."

"There is not a truth existing which I fear... or would wish unknown to the whole world."

"To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical."

"We are not to expect to be translated from despotism to liberty in a featherbed."

"When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty."

"Whenever a man has cast a longing eye on offices, a rottenness begins in his conduct."

"Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government"

"Wisdom I know is social. She seeks her fellows. But Beauty is jealous, and illy bears the presence of a rival."

“The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”
 every government, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference."

http://b-womeninamericanhistory19.blogspot.com/2011_07_01_archive.html
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Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies
eBooks @(Project Gutenberg)

NOTES ON THE STATE OF VIRGINIA by Thomas Jefferson

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS - The Thomas Jefferson Papers Timeline: 1743 -1827


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Original Jefferson Letters and Manuscripts from the University of Virginia's Special Collections
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The Writings of Thomas Jefferson by Thomas Jefferson (Project Gutenberg)
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Jefferson, Religion, and the Public Schools.
This extract is taken from Leonard Levy's book, Jefferson and Civil Liberties: The Darker Side, pp. 8 - 15
http://candst.tripod.com/tnppage/jeffschl.htm
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Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826. Letters - http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/JefLett.html